CFUW Stratford Receives Advocacy Award in Recognition of Work to Return More Trains to Stratford

cfuwadvocacytrain2

CFUW-Stratford Club Recognized for Advocacy

At the recent Canadian Federation of University Women (CFUW) National Annual General Meeting held in St. Catherines, Ontario, CFUW  Stratford received an Advocacy Award in recognition of their ongoing work to return more trains to Stratford through the gettingthere.ca campaign. Club co-operation with local, provincial and national organizations was also recognized.  The campaign began in 2012, with meetings with stakeholder groups to examine the impact of the removal of key VIA trains in 2012, and has continued through community partnerships with the City of Stratford, the Chamber of Commerce, the United Way, University of Waterloo Stratford Campus and the Festival Theatre, among others.

 

In June of 2015, VIA President Yves Desjardins-Siciliano came to Stratford with the promise of two additional trains, a morning commuter train at 6:30 AM, and an additional return train from Toronto at 4:30 PM. CFUW work in the community has continued with marketing meetings involving the stakeholders and VIA representatives to develop strategies to recreate rail culture and train use in Stratford once the new trains begin.  CFUW Stratford, along with its many community partners, looks forward to VIA’s proposed commencement of the additional trains in the Fall, demonstrating its commitment to SW Ontario public rail transportation.

CFUW-Stratford Club members Charlotte Gillett, Sheila Clarke, Nora Walden, Louise McColl, Mary Jane Amey and Mary Anne Van Den Heuvel wait for a train!

CFUW-Stratford Club members Charlotte Gillett, Sheila Clarke, Nora Walden, Louise McColl, Mary Jane Amey and Mary Anne Van Den Heuvel wait for a train!

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Motion to Leave GWI – June 2016 Correspondence

Motion to Leave GWI – June 2016 Correspondence
The motion to amend CFUW’s Articles and Bylaws to withdraw from Graduate Women International will be discussed and voted on at the upcoming AGM on June 24th/25th. The Articles and Bylaws Committee has circulated additional background from CFUW St. Thomas who proposed of the motion: Additional Background on Amendment 2 Proposed Amendments to CFUW Articles and Bylaws
CFUW Stratford’s Advocacy Committee recently sent questions to Myra Willis of the Articles and Bylaws Committee requesting sources to support statements offered as fact in the Additional Background document. We are awaiting responses from the St. Thomas club with their citations and clarifications. You can see all our correspondence here Motion to Leave GWI – Correspondence June 2016 2pgs which includes a 2nd chart from GWI’s recent financial statement that was not included in the Additional Background to Amendment 2.
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

CFUW-Stratford AGM May 24, 2016 – Queen’s Inn Stratford

CFUW-Stratford held its Annual General Meeting on May 24th at the Queen’s Inn, Stratford.

Guest Speaker Kiera Loughran, Associate Producer, The Forum and Laboratory, Stratford Festival.

Guest Speaker Kiera Loughran, Associate Producer, The Forum and Laboratory, Stratford Festival.

The Interest Group Basket Fundraiser was a great success. Nancy and Sylvia eye up the prize!

The Interest Group Basket Fundraiser was a great success. Nancy and Sylvia eye up the prize!

What surprises will this basket hold!?!

What surprises will this basket hold!

Fun and fellowship

Fun, fundraising and fellowship

Pat wins the Bridge Club basket for her table .

Pat wins the Bridge Club basket for her table .

Louise McColl accepts her prize as 2015-2016 CFUW-Stratford Bridge Champ!

Louise McColl accepts her prize as 2015-2016 CFUW-Stratford Bridge Champ!

A rose for each member of the 2016-2017 CFUW-Stratford Club Executive.

A rose for each member of the 2016-2017 CFUW-Stratford Executive.

Mary Jane Amey, incoming President CFUW-Stratford Club thanks Past President Charlotte Gillett for her diligence and grace in 2015-2016.

Mary Jane Amey, incoming President CFUW-Stratford thanks Past President Charlotte Gillett for her diligence and grace in 2015-2016.

CFUW Logo

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Annette Av Paul-April Guest Speaker for CFUW-Stratford

annette av paul

Picture

Annette av Paul

Born in Stockholm, Annette was accepted into the Royal Swedish Ballet School in 1953, where she trained for eight years. In 1962 she was picked from the school to dance the lead role in Prokofiev’s The Stone Flower, a ballet choreographed by Yuri Grigorovich, later the head of the Bolshoi Ballet in Moscow. That same year she joined the Royal Swedish Ballet, dancing in several ballets staged by its Director Antony Tudor, including Scenes from Childhood and also Echoes of Trumpets, which was created for her.

Brian Macdonald became Director in 1964. Annette danced in several of his renowned ballets such as the pas de deux Prothalamion with Bruce Marks (shown on Swedish television), and she created the Princess in Brian’s version of Firebird. She was Juliet in his Romeo and Juliet, Rose in Rose La Tulippe with music by Harry Freedman, and later the woman in Double Quartet and Adieu Robert Schumann composed by R. Murray Schafer. Annette danced many of the classics including The Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake, Giselle, and the Flower Festival pas de deux with Erik Bruhn.

Her first guest appearance with Les Grands Ballets Canadiens came in 1970 as the Sugar Plum Fairy in Fernand Nault’s The Nutcracker. In 1973, after more guest appearances, she became a permanent member of the company, and was principal dancer until she retired from her dancing career in 1984.  During that career she danced with major companies everywhere, equally accomplished and appreciated in the full classical repertoire as well as in many important contemporary roles. She has appeared in films and television as well as on the ballet stage.

In 1982 she danced in Tokyo at the 2nd World Peace Culture Festival; in 1983 she performed at a gala held to celebrate the re-opening of the Royal Swedish Opera House in Stockholm, a return to her roots.

In 1986, Annette became founding artistic director of Ballet British Columbia.  Since 1987 she has taught and coached throughout Canada, including work with the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, the National Ballet of Canada and its School, and Ballet Jorgen Canada. For 40 years Annette has been a member and subsequently the director of the summer dance program at The Banff Centre. Presently she teaches ballet as guest coach for the Stratford Festival and the Birmingham Conservatory.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

CFUW Stratford Responds to Motion to Withdraw from GWI

The National CFUW Board has instigated extensive discussion over the past year about GWI/IFUW (Graduate Women International, formerly International Federation of University Women) and CFUW’s relationship to GWI. Following this, the St. Thomas Club proposed a motion to amend the CFUW Articles and Bylaws to withdraw from membership in GWI by striking out Article 4 of the Canadian Federation of University Women Articles and Bylaws which refers to membership in the International Federation of University Women (IFUW).

This motion will be voted on at the CFUW National AGM in St. Catharines in June. A decision of this import, having ramifications beyond the borders of Canada, required extensive research that the Advocacy Committee has undertaken, so that CFUW members can make an informed decision.  Resources examined by the Committee include:

– Information from CFUW National – website, financials, responses to queries
– Information from GWI – website, financials, responses to queries
– Information from “Friends for GWI”
– Information from Past Presidents of CFUW
– Discussions with NFAs who are no longer part of GWI

Using the information gained, we provide a report with our assessment of the rationale for the motion to withdraw from GWI.  Please see the revised version: RESPONSE TO MOTION TO WITHDRAW FROM GWI.Stratford CFUW

 

CFUW Logo

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Artist Maxine Noel : February 23, 2016 : 7:30 p.m. Stratford Early Years Centre

Artist Maxine Noel and Pat Reavy of CFUW-Stratford. Maxine has created Not Forgotten, an artwork to remember and honour the spirits and presence of missing and murdered aboriginal women and girls.

Artist Maxine Noel and Pat Reavy of CFUW-Stratford. Maxine has created Not Forgotten, an artwork to remember and honour the spirits and presence of missing and murdered aboriginal women and girls.

Maxine Noel is an extremely gifted artist, internationally renowned for her exquisite fluid lines, vivid imagery and subtle colours.

For Noel,  “Art is the purest and truest expression of an individual. in it are all manners of things one is not always able to express verbally.”

A visionary elder gave Maxine Noel her Sioux name – Ioyan Mani – shortly after birth. It means to walk beyond and walk beyond she does.  Maxine Noel is a Santee Oglala Sioux, born in 1946 on the Birdtail Reserve in southwestern Manitoba.  The eldest of 11 children, she spent her early childhood amidst the positive reinforcements of a loving mother and grandmother on a quiet reserve.  There she learned how to draw.  Residential school was a part of every young Aboriginal person’s life, bringing with it the struggles of submersion of the native spirituality and culture.  Maxine feels that strength, enrichment and positive results came from the struggle.

While working for over a decade as a legal secretary in Edmonton and Toronto, Maxine continued with her art.  While working as acoordinator at a Native Friendship Centre in Northern Ontario, she was encouraged by a fellow Aboriginal artist to show her work to a Toronto art dealer.  Her career as an artist had begun.  Since that first one-person exhibition in 1980, Maxine has participated in many exhibitions.

Not Forgotten

Not Forgotten

With her experience in design, painting, etching, serigraphy, stone lithography and cast paper, Maxine Noel is able to use a wide range of media.  Her subjects are young mothers, dancers, lovers and animals of the plains.  The strength and freedom she closely identifies with are depicted in her two favorite subjects, the eagle and the hawk.  Maxine’s use of fluid images, flowing lines and subtle colours represent the essential characteristics of the Aboriginal people – their sensibilities, generosity and loving nature.  Her presentation is fresh and distinctly modern with mystical and spiritual qualities.  The flowing lines indicate strength and serenity while the simplicity of composition and abstraction give her paintings a unique character.

Her images have been commissioned to grace walls in private and corporate collections, as well as reports, books, magazines and calendars.

Maxine was one of the first artists to work with the Canada and Africa Twinning programs with ISAID and CUSO, contributing both time and images.

It is her strong commitment to her culture that involves her in work with the Native Earth Performing Arts, the Canadian Native Arts Foundation and the Association for Native Development in the Performing and Visual Arts.  She works actively as a board member, consultant, artistic director and artist; she has lectured and been a panel member at the Saskatchewan School of Fine Arts, the University of Western Ontario and the native program at the Ontario College of Art.

Maxine Noel believes that there is a common denominator in all cultures of the world.  With that ideal in mind, she has participated in video productions as well as television and radio interviews which act as tools to assist in bridging the gap between Aboriginals and non-Aboriginals, both young and old. Her dedication, commitment, strength and self-determination make her an invaluable role model for all.

In her own words, Ioyan Mani said, “There comes a time in life when knowing oneself seems to magically fall into place, where life is less of a struggle and we make a place for peace and joy in our lives.  This is that time in my life.  I have never felt better about who and where I am.  When I was born a visionary elder gave me my Sioux name ‘Walk Beyond.’  I feel that through my painting I have been able to honour that gift.”

Each member in attendance received an art card of Maxine Noel's painting Autumn's Daughter. Many thanks to the artist.

Each member in attendance received an art card of Maxine Noel’s painting Autumn’s Daughter. Many thanks to the artist.

 

CFUW Logo

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Mary Hofstetter : 7:30 p.m. on January 26, 2016 at the Stratford Early Years Centre, 35 Waterloo Street North, Stratford

 

Mary Hofstetter: Photo Globe and Mail

Mary Hofstetter:
Photo Globe and Mail

Mary expressed her satisfaction in being able to participate in this year’s program – Women in the Arts, as promotion of women and art have been her twin passions throughout her career.

She provided a brief background of her experience, which included progressively higher level positions at Conestoga College, then Mohawk College, and culminating at Sheridan College, where she was President and CEO for 12 years. She was particularly happy to be with Sheridan College as it is the premier college in Canada for arts and animation. In 1995, she was recruited by Richard Monette to be General Manager of the Stratford Festival, a role she fulfilled for 2 years.

In 1999, she was invited by the CEO of the Banff Centre to replace him, which she did for 12 years. She called this “an amazing opportunity.” Thousands of artists, musicians, writers, playwriters, and other creative people visit the Banff Centre each year looking for an inspirational place to work, where they can test the boundaries of their art among their peers.

The Banff Centre was created in 1933, by a group of thespians. It is situated on Sleeping Buffalo Mountain, where three valleys converge, conferring special status in native culture, making it a powerful place. In 1935, painting and playwriting were on offer as well. Other the years the Centre was administered by the University of Alberta, then by the University of Calgary, but in 1978, it became a ‘stand alone, non-parchment’ institution. The thirteen programs offered at that time included native art. Since the institution does not issue degrees, diplomas, or certificates, there is almost limitless possibilities for what the artist can achieve here, without the constraints of an established syllabus. Each artist has the opportunity to develop their art, using a personalized guide developed by their mentors. Furthermore, it is a residential programme, offering accommodations, sustenance, all materials necessary to the art (within reason). While the artists attending the Banff Centre can be as young as 18(more likely with dancers), most are mid-career artists, but can also be into their 80’s.

In 1999, at the time Mary arrived to take the helm, the Centre was in dire need of refurbishment. Funding was suffering as the triple threat of 9/11, SARS, and Alberta’s sole Mad Cow case discouraged travelers and tourism. She came to find the Centre with non-viable funds, so the Board hired a consultant to help design a fund-raising scheme to raise $5 million, but their report suggested $3 million as an optimistically attainable goal. The report was discarded and they set about to raise $20 million initially, but quickly increased that to $50 million.

Mary suggested that when fund-raising, it is important to hide this fact until at least 70% of the funds are in place, then make a big announcement. With success assured, many private donors will jump on the success bandwagon. To initiate fund development, Mary spent several years cultivating relationships with decision-makers in government, with business leaders, and philanthropists. This was rewarded by a promise of $20 million from the Province of Alberta and $70 million from the Government of Canada, but it was stipulated that additional funds had to come from private sources.

Jack Diamond was hired to design the refurbishment of the Banff Centre. The vision was to make the Banff Centre an ‘essential destination’ for the artist, inspiring creativity. After eight years, the relationship-building and fund-raising culminated in the opening of the Shaw Amphitheatre in 2011. The Shaw family donated significantly to this building and retained naming rights.

Glen Sather, of New Rangers fame, donated a historic Banff home that he owned to the Banff Centre. This gift included all costs associated with the move of the house from Banff to the Centre, which included taking down all overhead wires on the route, cutting the house into seven pieces, loading it onto trucks, transporting it up a narrow mountain road with hairpin turns, and re-assembling it on a prepared concrete pad at the Banff Centre.

The Centre was also gifted with a piece of art created by Brian Jungen. Similarly, the Jim Kinnear Centre was substantially funded with a gift of $10 million. The campaign closed in 2011, having raised over $120 million. At that point, Mary left the Centre, and has occupied her time since doing volunteer work and consulting.

At this point, Mary is somewhat concerned about the dearth of new generation leaders in the Arts. There is very limited potential for training in both experiential art, art education, and business/financial management. There is also a lack of mentoring in the field. In response to questions from the audience, Mary stated that she took a course in financial accounting during her sojourn at the colleges in response to her deficit in training in this area. She also stated that current institutions lack the capacity to mentor and train individuals to move from lower/middle levels to upper management. That it would be necessary to match a trainee with a mentor, but this match would have to be very exact.

Charlotte Gillett thanked Mary for her interesting presentation and informed the membership that Mary had graciously donated her honorarium to the Scholarship Fund.

A snowy view of the Banff Centre.

A snowy view of the Banff Centre.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.